Collecting Spiders as a Hobby and for Education

Home | Spider Bites | Camel Spider Pictures | Stories | Links | Site Map

Collecting Spiders

Collecting Spiders

  • Collecting spiders is a good way to get to know them better and appreciate them more. If you hunt with a camera, you may capture some splendid photographs of these colorful and unusual creatures.
  • Many spiders are active at night, and you can find them by shining a flashlight into vegetation. Wolf spider eyes reflect light, causing a night meadow to appear to twinkle.
  • You can easily capture spiders using a small glass jar. You can also use a pillowcase or canvas net to sweep vegetation, or to place under bushes as you shake them.
  • Collection for scientific, school or personal research sometimes requires the preservation of specimens in 70-percent ethyl or rubbing alcohol. If you pursue such studies, remember to make careful notes of the spider's location (on plants, rocks, soil, etc.), habits, appearance and coloration prior to capture, and any further information that may help you to identify your specimen. Remember, although specific spider identification can be difficult, the broad categories are more easily distinguished.
  • Spiders have been residents of the earth for 400 million years. Primitive spiders found preserved in amber look remarkably similar to our present-day species. Whether the prospect of observing these eight-legged creatures excites you or not, one thing is certain—spiders are here to stay.

Collecting spiders is a good way to gain a greater appreciation and understanding of spider natural history. If you hunt with a camera, you may capture some splendid photographs of these colorful and unusual creatures.

  • Many spiders are active at night and can be found by shining a flashlight into vegetation. Wolf spider eyes reflect light, causing a night meadow to appear to twinkle.
  • Arachnids can be captured easily using small glass vials. You can also use a pillow case of canvas net to sweep vegetation, or to place under bushes as you shake them.
  • Collection for scientific, school or personal research sometimes requires the preservation of specimens in 70-percent ethyl or rubbing alcohol. If you pursue such studies, remember to make careful notes of the spider's location (on plants, rocks, soil, etc), habits, appearance and coloration prior to capture, and any further information that may help you to identify your specimen. Remember, although specific spider identification can be difficult, the broad categories are more easily distinguished.
  • Spiders have been residents of the earth for 400 million years. Primitive spiders found preserved in amber look remarkably similar to our present-day species. Whether the prospect of observing these eight-legged creatures excites you or not, one thing is certain-spiders are here to stay.

CAMEL SPIDER FACTS

Help find a cure. Support Susan G. Komen in finding a cure for Breast Cancer. Truekare is a proud supporter of CBCN Charity Auction. Find Mastectomy Products and Enhancers at www.truekare.com


HOME | SPIDER DEFINITIONS |BLACK WIDOW | CAMEL SPIDER STORIES |BROWN RECLUSE | SPIDER PICTURES | SPIDER FACTS |
AVOID BITES
| LARGE CAMEL SPIDER PICTURE | TARANTULA |HOUSE SPIDERS | SPIDER BITES | CONTACT
|SITE MAP

Copyright © 2003-15 camelspiders.net. All Rights Reserved.